Art Newsletter

November / December / January

Mandy Bohner '83

Early Learning Center

       After our Yayoi Kusama study, we continued our journey throughout Japan, making simple origami, paper lanterns and cherry tree branches painted with watercolor. The children also learned about Gyotaku, a printmaking technique originally developed by Japanese fishermen to record the sizes of fish caught.  While our fish were replicas, the children had fun printing everything from perch to stingrays. 
       In the midst of our study of Japanese art, we took the time to thread needles and sew initials for Christmas ornaments. We also worked on clay skills while making ceramic angels.  Both of these projects are annual events that showcase the growth of ability from year to year. The angels, specifically, are a sweet representation of time here at St. Nicholas - I absolutely love my own personal collection from my children!
       We completed our study of Japan in early January and moved onto the art of India.  We looked at the symmetry of Mandalas and the designs of Rangolis and using that knowledge, the children created their own Rangolis using foam shapes and beads. We also took a look at the lacquered art from Kashmir and the Madhubani paintings from the Mithila region, which are done with a variety of tools, including fingers and twigs. For our Madhubani paintings, the children designed a background with paint sticks and added a tree using tempera paint. I love the bright colors and the patterns of these - they did a great job. 
       As always, if you are on campus, come take a look at all of their art hanging in the ELC hall.

older girl showing her hand made sculpture creationchildren creating sculpture from clayyoung boy painting in art class

Lower Primary

       After our Yayoi Kusama study, we continued our journey throughout Japan, making koinobori or carp kites, and cherry tree branches painted with watercolor. The children also learned about Gyotaku, a printmaking technique originally developed by Japanese fishermen to record the sizes of fish caught.  While our fish were replicas, the children had fun printing everything from perch to stingrays. 
       In the midst of our study of Japanese art, we took the time to thread needles and sew Christmas ornaments. We also worked on clay skills while making ceramic angels.  Since these projects are annual events, they are a great showcase of the growth in ability from year to year. The angels, specifically, are a sweet representation of time here at St. Nicholas - I absolutely love my own personal collection from my children!
       We completed our study of Japan in early January and moved onto the art of India.  We looked at the symmetry of Mandalas and the designs of Rangolis and using that knowledge, the children created their own Rangolis using silk leaves and beads. We also took a look at the lacquered art from Kashmir, which led to their own version of “lacquered” turtles, using oil pastels and metallic markers on paper. To complete our study of Indian art, we explored the Madhubani paintings from the Mithila region, which are done with a variety of tools, including fingers and twigs. For their version of Madhubani paintings, the children designed a background with paint sticks and added a tree using tempera paint using brushes and fingers -  I love the bright colors and the patterns of these - they did a great job! 
       As always, if you are on campus, come take a look at all of their art hanging in cafeteria.

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Middle Primary

       After our Yayoi Kusama study, we continued our journey throughout Japan, making Japanese lanterns, decorated with cherry tree branches painted with watercolor. The children also learned about Gyotaku, a printmaking technique originally developed by Japanese fishermen to record the sizes of fish caught.  While our fish were replicas, the children had fun printing everything from perch to stingrays. 
      In the midst of our study of Japanese art, we took the time to thread needles and sew Christmas ornaments. We also worked on clay skills while making ceramic angels.  Since these projects are annual events, they are a great showcase of the growth in ability from year to year. The angels, specifically, are a sweet representation of time here at St. Nicholas - I absolutely love my own personal collection from my children!
       We completed our study of Japan in early January and moved onto the art of India.  We looked at the symmetry of Mandalas and the designs of Rangolis and using that knowledge, the children created their own Rangolis using silk flowers and beads. We also took a look at the lacquered art from Kashmir, which led to their own version of “lacquered” elephants, using oil pastels and metallic markers on paper.  To complete our study of Indian art, we explored the Madhubani paintings from the Mithila region, which are done with a variety of tools, including fingers and twigs. For their Madhubani paintings, the children designed a background with paint sticks and added a tree using tempera paint using brushes and fingers -  I love the bright colors and the patterns of these - they did a great job! 
      As always, if you are on campus, come take a look at all of their art hanging in Chapel/Fine Arts building.

group of young children painting in art classtwo girls creating painted and glitter platesgirl showing her painting of grass and flowers

Upper Primary

       After our Yayoi Kusama study, we continued our journey throughout Japan, making Japanese lanterns, decorated with cherry tree branches painted with watercolor. The children also learned about Gyotaku, a printmaking technique originally developed by Japanese fishermen to record the sizes of fish caught.  While our fish were replicas, the children had fun printing everything from perch to stingrays. 
      In the midst of our study of Japanese art, we took the time to thread needles and sew Christmas ornaments. We also worked on clay skills while making ceramic angels.  Since these projects are annual events, they are a great showcase of the growth in ability from year to year. The angels, specifically, are a sweet representation of time here at St. Nicholas - I absolutely love my own personal collection from my children!
       We completed our study of Japan in early January and moved onto the art of India.  We looked at the symmetry of Mandalas and the designs of Rangolis and using that knowledge, the children created their own Rangolis using silk flowers and beads. We also took a look at the lacquered art from Kashmir, which led to their own version of “lacquered” swans, using oil pastels and metallic markers on paper. To complete our study of Indian art, we explored the Madhubani paintings from the Mithila region, which are done with a variety of tools, including fingers and twigs. For their Madhubani paintings, the children designed a background with paint sticks and added a tree using tempera paint using brushes and fingers -  I love the bright colors and the patterns of these - they did a great job! 
       As always, if you are on campus, come take a look at all of their art hanging in the Chapel/Fine Arts building.


ST NICHOLAS SCHOOL 7525 Min Tom Drive | Chattanooga, Tennessee 37421 | ph: (423).899.1999 | fax: (423).899.0109 | [email protected]